Tree Magic

Thirteen-year-old Rainbow discovers she can communicate with trees. But that’s just the beginning. Her magic hands can shape trees at her will, but her gift is dangerous and has fatal consequences. An accident that leaves Rainbow unconscious leads her mother to make a confession that will change Rainbow’s life forever. Are her abilities a gift or a curse? Can Rainbow really trust her mother? From England to France, through secrets, fears and parallel worlds, Rainbow’s journey to understand her powers takes her beyond everything she’s ever known. To find the truth, she must also find herself.



This novel captured my attention much more deeply than I had anticipated due to a picturesque writing and intelligent plot. The settings were vividly detailed and at times you can almost feel the trees under your fingertips as if Rainbow is guiding your hand.

 I thought the author created some beautiful characters that were complex and magical in this wonderfully imaginative story. There was something graceful and poetic about Rainbow’s connection to the trees; in some ways it reminded me a bit of the Lorax. The plot surprises and penetrating details swirl together for a mesmerizing novel.

 The story moves very slowly in some ways as if mimicking the growth of the trees while trying to tell the story of Rainbow’s foundational years. Eventually it’ll pick up but there are no action, rollercoaster like moments that will glue you to the pages. Instead what keeps you reading are the character portrayals mixed into the journey of self-discovery which let your mind relax so you can feel some true moments of peace and beauty.

 It’s a good book for middle school kids and teens to read as they’re dealing with similar challenges of growing up on their way to adulthood. Along with some of the prototypical stuff you’d find in a coming of age story the magical element that whisks you towards the conclusion will take you on one last emotional push as Harriet Springbett does her best to bring everything together in this unique exploration of life as we forget to live it.

 Thank you to Netgalley and Impress Books for allowing me to review this book.

 Buy at Amazon:

*synopsis and pic from netgalley.com

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